Robbins SCE Research
Home| British Columbia Polls| Canada Polls| US & the World Polls| Contact| Register| Search| Donate
ROBBINS on Obama (Democrats) (Re-release from August 6, 07)
  Feb 18, 2008

A random sample of 500 Democratic Party supporters (23 spoiled), between December 3-6th, 2007. This poll features a margin of error of 5.25%, 18 times out of 20 @95% competency/confidence. Sponsored by ROBBINS.

Question #1
Democratic Presidential candidate Barack Obama vowed that as President of the United States he would attack Pakistan to eradicate Taliban and al-Qaeda bases generally known to be in place there. U.S President George W. Bush is serously concerned that such a policy would "destabalize the Pakastani Musharaff regime/government." On this account who do you believe to be more correct?
Barack Obama    54 %
George W. Bush    22 %
Neither    24 %
Question #2
Would you under Barack Obama's plan put soldiers on the ground in Pakistan, use air strikes, or use both soldiers on the ground and air strikes?
Soldiers on the ground    18 %
Air strikes only    53 %
Air strikes and soldiers following    29 %
Neither/None    19 %
Question #3
Who is your preferred choice for Democratic nominee for President of the United States?
Hillary Clinton    40 %
Barack Obama    33 %
John Edwards    27 %
Commentary
Observations:
In a previous poll ROBBINS suggested US Presidential hopeful Barack Obama to 'get more muscular'. This poll supports the old Robbins axiom 'never underestimate a Black man's punching power'. Mr. Obama received a very positive response in this poll, in a culture of 'calling responses' which suggested not everyone is watching the news.
This 'all Democratic supporter' poll also suggests that there are Hillary Clinton supporters who would prefer to select George W. Bush's position over Barack Obama, rather than neither, which many John Edwards supporters were more inclined to select. This isn't to say that they support George W. Bush politically, it does suggest that they are a little put off by Mr. Obama's fairly obvious intentions for the main job, not vice-president.
It seems that younger men and older women alike are ready to support Mr. Obama's plan, "to do what we should have done in the first place."
One elderly respondent suggested that Mr. Obama "could do whatever he thought best", while a Clinton supporter said "Who can take this guy seriously?"
The number of respondents who were willing to suggest some type of military actioin in question #2 against a 19% "neither/none" suggests that Americans may want 'the soldiers out of Iraq, but not necessarily home'.
Measured against the establishment position of getting out of Iraq, (and Hillary Clinton may be the establishment or representative of much of it), Mr. Obama has staked out his own claim on US foreign policy against terrorism. To many respondents who were unaware of this position (remember many mainstream polls ask questions which seem to reflect an assumption about who and how many are watching the news), Mr. Obama is making the right choice. How he tightens this up so that his plan is both cogent and cohesive will be seen in the days and months ahead.

Home| British Columbia Polls| Canada Polls| US and the World Polls| Contact| Register| Search| Site Map
Copyright Robbins SCE Research Inc. ©2017