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BC wants an Elected Senator, Ranta and BC Conservatives have tough road, Campbell's BC Liberals cornered!
  Aug 09, 2004

Once again, ROBBINS takes the cluttered and corrupt world of BC politics and attempts to make sense of it. This random telephone survey of 650 respondents throughout Vancouver Island, the Lower Mainland of BC, and the Okanagan, Northern and Kootenay Regions of the Province was undertaken between August 5-10, 2004. Respondents are somewhat relative to population density and political riding distribution. The margin of error is 5.75%, 18 times out of 20 @ 97% competency.

Question #1
In your opinion which of the following two phrases best describes how you believe BC laws should be applied:
BC laws should be applied equally to all no matter the circumstances    94.38 %
BC laws should be applied equally to all, except in some circumstances where necessary    4.79 %
Question #2
In your opinion should BC Senators sent to Ottawa be:
Appointed    17.85 %
Elected    82.15 %
Question #3
In a northern BC town, a man and his wife run a taxi service properly registered with the province. The province allows native Indians in the area to run their own unregistered taxi service. In your opinion should the native Indians be allowed to run their own unregistered taxi service in this northern BC town?
Yes    6.45 %
No    93.55 %
Question #4
In your opinion, should Prime Minister Paul Martin be permitted to ignore current BC laws enacted by former Premier Glen Clark which demand that Senators from BC be elected, and appoint a Senator of his choosing from BC?
Yes    23.97 %
No    76.03 %
Question #5
Historically, minority governments like the one we currently have in Ottawa do not last a full term. In your opinion, when should the next federal election be held?
one year from now    42.98 %
one and one-half years from now    17.02 %
two years from now    4.63 %
the Paul Martin liberal government should run its natural course    35.21 %
Question #6
If a new third party is formed in British Columbia, and current BC Liberals ‘cross the floor’ to help form the initial nucleus of that party will you seriously consider voting for that new party in May 2005?
Yes    13.88 %
No    75.70 %
Undecided    10.41 %
Question #7
If a new Conservative Party is formed in time to challenge for government in the May 2005 BC general election, would you seriously consider voting for them?
Yes    19.34 %
No    75.54 %
Undecided/Other    5.12 %
Question #8
Baseline question: Which of the following provincial parties are you leaning towards supporting as of today?
BC Liberals    27.60 %
BC NDP    37.85 %
Green Party    9.09 %
Reform BC    10.08 %
Other/Undecided    15.37 %
Commentary
An overwhelming majority of British Columbians are of the opinion that laws should be applied equally to all persons, including natives.
This sense of legal equality applies to BC’s next Senator. If Paul Martin follows former Premier Glen Clark’s legislation, British Columbians will vote for their next Senator. Conservative MP John Reynolds has called on Gordon Campbell to demand the next BC Senator be elected.
A new Conservative Party for BC has no easy road either. Many of the respondents who would seriously consider supporting this new party chose ‘other’ in the baseline question. Also few Reformers crossed over to the Conservative Party. BC Reformers feel they have already compromised their principles once for the watered down version of the Canadian Alliance, some are bewildered as to why they should have to do it again provincially.
Few British Columbians are willing to accept the comprises made to equal justice for all, as this pertains to government treatment of native Indians. Unfortunately the way things are working the native Indians are not happy with their treatment, and the silent majority isn't happy as well.

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